Online Forum–Black Women and Brown v. Board of Education

Linda Brown Smith, Ethel Louise Belton Brown, Harry Briggs, Jr., and Spottswood Bolling, Jr. during a press conference at Hotel Americana, 1964 (Library of Congress)
October 10, 2022 to October 14, 2022

Black Perspectivesthe award-winning blog of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS) is hosting an online forum on the theme “Black Women and Brown v. Board of Education.” Organized by Professor Hettie V. Williams, the online forum brings together scholars to discuss and contextualize Black women’s contributions toward the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision. The online forum begins on Monday, October 10th, and concludes on Friday, October 14th. It will feature contributions from Drs. Hettie V. Williams, Graham Russell Gao Hodges, Lacey P. HunterTejai Beulah Howard, and Tomiko Brown-Nagin.

During the online forum, Black Perspectives will publish new blog posts every day at 6:00AM EST. Please follow Black Perspectives (@BlkPerspectives) and AAIHS (@AAIHS) on Twitter, like AAIHS on Facebook, or subscribe to our blog for updates. By subscribing to Black Perspectives, each new post will automatically be delivered to your inbox during the week of the roundtable.


About the Organizer

Hettie V. Williams is the president of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS). She is an Associate Professor of African American history in the Department of History and Anthropology at Monmouth University. Her latest book publications include Bury My Heart in a Free Land: Black Women Intellectuals in Modern U.S. History (Praeger, 2017) and, with Dr. G. Reginald Daniel, Race and the Obama Phenomenon: The Vision of a More Perfect Multiracial Union (University Press of Mississippi 2014). Her forthcoming books are A Seat at the Table: Black Women Public Intellectuals in U.S. History and Culture (University Press of Mississippi, 2021) and Garden of Opportunity: Black Women and the Civil Rights Movement in New Jersey (Rutgers University, Press, 2021). Follow her on Twitter @DrHettie2017.


About the Participants

Graham Russell Gao Hodges is the George Dorland Langdon, Jr. Professor of History and Africana Studies at Colgate University. He is the author of many books including, most recently, Black New Jersey from 1664 to the Present Day and The Marion Thompson Wright Reader, both from Rutgers University Press. He has directed eight NEH Summer Institutes on Abolitionism and the Underground Railroad. 

 


Lacey P. Hunter is a faculty instructor in the African American Studies and the Honors College at Rutgers University, Newark. She received her PhD from Drew University. Her dissertation focused on the role of African American religious ideologies on racial constructions. She holds an MA in American History from Rutgers University-Newark and is currently teaching courses on African American Studies and Afro-American History. She is actively involved in organizations that help urban students transition into college, as well as collaborative programs for “at-risk” college freshmen. She is also deeply committed to restructuring historical teaching and encouraging greater literacy rates among students of color.


Tejai Beulah Howard is assistant professor of history and African American religious and ethical studies at Methodist Theological School in Ohio in Delaware, Ohio and a certified spiritual director. Dr. Beulah Howard’s recent writing is featured in the book, We Cry Justice: Reading the Bible with the Poor People’s Campaign (Broadleaf, 2021) edited by Rev. Liz Theoharis, The Other Journal, Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology, and Journal of American Academy of Religion. She is currently at work on a monograph on the role of the black power movement and black evangelical preachers. For fun, she enjoys music, bookstores, true crime documentaries, and sports. She resides in Columbus, Ohio with her amazing spouse, Jenn.


Tomiko Brown-Nagin is dean of Harvard Radcliffe Institute, one of the world’s leading centers for interdisciplinary research across the humanities, sciences, social sciences, arts, and professions. She is also the Daniel P.S. Paul Professor of Constitutional Law at Harvard Law School and a professor of history at Harvard University. She is a contributing editor to POLITICO Magazine as well as a frequent lecturer and media commentator. Brown-Nagin’s latest book, Civil Rights Queen: Constance Baker Motley and the Struggle for Equality (Pantheon, 2022), explores the life and times of the pathbreaking lawyer, politician, and judge. Her book Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement (Oxford University Press, 2011) won a 2012 Bancroft Prize in American History, among other honors.

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