Kellie Carter Jackson

IMG_8336Kellie Carter Jackson is a 19th century historian in the Department of History at Hunter College, CUNY. Carter Jackson’s research focuses on violence as a political discourse, slavery and emancipation in the Atlantic World, historical film, and black women’s history. Her manuscript, “Force & Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence,” examines the political and social tensions preceding the American Civil War and the condition and that led some black abolitionists to believe that slavery might only be abolished by violent force. Before coming to Hunter College, she was a Harvard College Fellow in the Department of African & African American Studies at Harvard University. She earned her Ph.D from Columbia University working closely with Eric Foner and her B.A in Print Journalism from Howard University. She has published an essay, “Violence and Political History,” in the American Historical Association’s Perspectives on History magazine and a chapter, “‘At the Risk of Our Own Lives’: Violence and the Fugitive Slave Law in Pennsylvania” in the edited collection, The Civil War in Pennsylvania: The African American Experience (2013). She is also a contributor to Quartz, a division of the The Atlantic Monthly, Cognoscenti, WBUR’s ideas and opinion page (Boston’s NPR news station) and The Conversation, an online magazine in Australia, which features the latest ideas and research. Her article, “Is Viola Davis in it?: Black Women Actors and the Single Stories of Historical Film” was published in Transition Magazine, Issue 114. She is currently co-editing a book with Erica L. Ball on Reconsidering Roots: Observations on the 40th Anniversary of a TV Mini-Series that changed the Way We Understood American Slavery. She currently resides in Brooklyn, NY.

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